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November 2015

The Demonic Moving Portraits of Brandon Muir

The Demonic Moving Portraits of Brandon Muir

Creepy crawlies, ghasts and ghouls take center stage in Brandon Muir‘s spine-chilling cutout GIFs. Muir’s process starts like that of any collage artist as he cuts up old NatGeo and LIFE magazines to build a mutated army of characters. “The similarities with purist collage makers probably end when I port everything over to Photoshop, where the possibilities are endless,” he tells The Creators Project.

He works fast, spending between one and four hours animating the pieces into each GIF. “If something doesn’t look interesting to me or come together in one sit down, I usually scrap it and start over,” he explains. He started out working exclusively in Photoshop, but he’s been getting into AfterEffects recently, and it shows in his most recent GIFs. His creatures are surrounded by more complex textures and endowed them with subtle movement than in previous work, but they all accomplish the same effect. Says Muir, “[My] one intention with these animations is to ride the line between a disgusted cringe and a smooth chunky chuckle.”

Check out more of Brandon Muir’s work on his website.

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Via The creators project

 Video Projection Mapping Festival in Niigata, Japan.

Video Projection Mapping Festival in Niigata, Japan.

From Ruestungsschmie:

This is our contribution for the 1 Minute Projection Mapping Festival 2015 in Niigata, Japan.
Deconstruction of the given architecture and Japan´s unique geological sitaution and history were the driving inspirational factors for this project. Thanks to our partner A.P. Fromm for his work in this projection.

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Via Vimeo

 Jan Fabre’s Jarring Marble Sculptures of Human Brains

Jan Fabre’s Jarring Marble Sculptures of Human Brains

Do we feel with our brain and think with our heart? This is a question that Belgian multidisciplinary artist Jan Fabre has continually explored in recent sculptures. Fabre is perhaps best known for his “Bic-Art” series, after he famously locked himself inside of a white cube for three days and covered it with blue pen drawings. However, it is his massive sculptures of brains made of Carrara marble that are his most personal. He relates the human brain to the idea of a post-mortem phase of life, after experiencing a “milky tunnel” of white while in a coma. Those who come upon the series may encounter a jarring combination of horror and amusement. The series portrays brains pierced by sharp objects like scissors and cork screws, while others are crawling with insects or holding up giant bananas. Many of these pieces arose out of his conversations with prominent neurophysiologist Giacomo Rizzolatti. The brains even appear as an element of his gisants, marble replicas of corpses resting on tombs. Other notable works by Fabre include sculptures made of bronze and bugs, as in his “Heaven of Delight” installation built using the shining shells of 1.6 million beetles. Fabre’s Carrara sculptures are featured in his upcoming 30-year retrospective, spanning 7 rooms at Deweer Gallery in Belgium- and “Do we feel with our brain and think with our heart?” will be at the heart of the exhibit.

Jan Fabr’s “30 Years/7 Rooms” opens on November 1st at Deweer Gallery in Belgium, and will be on view from November 4th through December 20th, 2015.

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Via Hi Fructose

Video of the Day: Woodkid “Volcano” (Live Performance)

Video of the Day: Woodkid “Volcano” (Live Performance)

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Epic live performance of “Volcano” by the always incredible, Woodkid. Recorded at Zenith de Paris and directed by Katya Mokolo. Woodkid has also (finally) recorded a studio version of the instrumental track, which is currently available for free download on his website! Full video and link below!

Woodkid’s Website

Katya Mokolo’s Website

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Via Booooooom

Step into an Interactive 3D Galaxy of Sound With “ClinK”

Step into an Interactive 3D Galaxy of Sound With “ClinK”

For artists at Germany’s Wisp, sticking to one medium of expression is unheard of. Their work blends science and art, incorporating the tangible with the more cryptic physical properties of our world – like the way we interact with light and sound.

Their latest installation, “ClinK,” is an audio-visual immersion that allows users to control what they see and hear, simply by moving their bodies.

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To achieve the effect, Wisp created a dome-structure made of hexagonal pieces, each connected by one of 30 speakers. Using the vvvv coding toolkit and four Kinect cameras, the team is able to sync a viewer’s movements with a 360 degree projection map of space-inspired graphics and sound – it makes each person, for a brief moment, the architect of their own tiny universe.

“ClinK challenges the boundaries of the human auditive and visual perceptions,” the creative team explains. “Each body and its dynamic attributes are directly transformed into audio feedback and transformations of visual objects. [You can] manipulate sound sources and move them through space in a way that their exact position concretely and vividly occur in front of you.”

There’s just something about kinetic art that makes us want to jump in, and the resulting video is pretty unbelievable. But even so, Wisp makes it clear that this offers just a small taste of the experience. “Here, you’re getting a rectangular and stereo version of the exhibit,” they say. “But we wanted all of those who couldn’t take part at the exhibition to enjoy a short impression.”

ALL IMAGES: Wisp

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Via Nerdist

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Unusual and Surprising Nude Photographs by Wacław Wantuch

Unusual and Surprising Nude Photographs by Wacław Wantuch

Polish fine art photographer Waclaw Wantuch presents the nude figure in unusual and surprising ways. The models in his highly stylized black and white photographs are captured in dramatic positions against a vacant background. Many times they are cropped and contorted in a way that is completely unrecognizable as human. Each model’s body is tense with a compressed energy, where muscled limbs, perfect breasts and buttocks are bent in a way that is reminiscent of those seen on ancient Greek figures. Careful lighting enhances details like texture and moisture on the skin, also creating an elegant study of tone and form. Wantuch treats the body like a sculpture, full of repressed emotions that can only be expressed through its beauty, sexuality and and extremity.

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Via Hifructose

Turn Movements into Sounds at This Reality-Bending Installation

Turn Movements into Sounds at This Reality-Bending Installation

A Kinect and Oculus Rift come together to play with people’s sensations in a virtual world where “Movement becomes sound – sound becomes light – time is bending in the mirror  – and matter dissolves in a fluid stream of particles.” The piece is called Mirror and is by Berlin-based design studio Schnellebuntebilder—Sebastion Huber, Robert Pohle, and Johannes Timpernagel—with sound design by Kling Klang Klong.

The installation displaces the user in a disorientating virtual environment where their actions have audiovisual consequences, and the body becomes a tool for creating experimental sounds and images.

The group explain how it works: “This installation analyzes the movement of the user and transform sound and visuals in the very same moment. A MAXMSP-Patch is analysing the head and limb-positions and generates 3d-sound-scapes (binaural) in order to boost the immersive experience. Depending on the agility of the user the audio-visual journey is told faster or slower and is connected tightly to every movement and noise happening.”

The piece premiered at NODE Festival earlier this year and has been touring several places since. Check out some images below:

Images and GIFs via Schnellebuntebilder

Click here to check out more from Schnellebuntebilder.

Via The Creators Project

A High Fashion Dress Meets High Tech Projections

A High Fashion Dress Meets High Tech Projections

GIF and Screencaps by the author, via

Up-and-coming fashion designer out of Istanbul, Ece Özalp asks What is Real? in a new audiovisual performance that combines filmmaking, projection mapping, and high fashion.

The lines, patterns, and forms of her first collection, Perception, caught the eye of Bİ’ŞEYLER, a Turkish new media agency with a passion for integrated design and production. Using Perception has a base model, Bİ’ŞEYLER took the young designer’s vision to the next level in the form of a performative fashion film/light show. Özalp’s kaleidoscopic designs and abstract fractal patterns are projected onto a 3D scanned dress of her design, much like the audiovisual installation for fashion label DROMe, or Frank Sorbier’s Haute Couture Fairy Tale, playing with our sense of depth and spatial awareness. It’s as if an entire new line of dresses is unfolding right before your eyes.

 

What is Real? I A/V Performance For Ece Ozalp’s Creation from Bİ’ŞEYLER on Vimeo.

Check out the project’s page on Behance, here.

More from the designer, here. And for more from Bİ’ŞEYLER, click here.

Via The Creators Project

Claustrophobia Goes Digital in a Terrifying Immersive Environment

Claustrophobia Goes Digital in a Terrifying Immersive Environment

Is it possible that our digital mobile devices have created a new form of claustrophobia? Do these devices induce a sense that we cannot escape our screens, producing feelings of anxiety, fear, terror and other emotions and states of mind in the process?

This notion of “digital claustrophobia” gets explored in multimedia artist Alec Maassen’s PHOBIA, a projection-mapped installation that sits in a 4′ x 4′ x 8′ room with walls of hanging, rear-projected PVC screen.

“One at a time, a viewer steps inside the structure to experience an audiovisual environment with custom sound and visuals,” Maassen explains. “Rear projection screen allows for a viewer to see projected content on either side with no loss of quality. The visuals projected onto each wall are meant to induce emotions of excitement, discomfort, anxiety, and even paranoia—feelings which traditionally come from people with claustrophobia.”

PHOBIA from Alec Maassen on Vimeo.

Initially, the luminous white graphics appear intermittently along with sparkling electronic sounds—nothing alarming. In fact, it’s rather beautiful. But Maassen builds the animated sequences in intensity until the senses overload like a bad psychedelic trip from which there is no escape.

Maasen created PHOBIA as part of senior project course at UCLA’s Design Media Arts program. Click here to see more of his work.

Via Projection Mapping Central

Hordes of Silhouettes Form Trees and Other Figures in New Murals from David de la Mano & Pablo Herrero

Hordes of Silhouettes Form Trees and Other Figures in New Murals from David de la Mano & Pablo Herrero

Artist collaborators David de la Mano & Pablo S. Herrero have unveiled mural after mural this year from Winter Haven, Florida to Gdansk, Poland. The duo uses only black paint to create elaborate silhouetted figures of trees, whales, and human forms. You can see much more of their recent work here. (via Colossal Submissions)

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Via This is colossal

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